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The History of the Light Bulb

How Inventing the Light Bulb Revolutionized Our Lives, Landscape and Economy

 

In The Beginning...
 
  1. Sunlight and fire were the earliest forms of lighting.

    The history of the light bulb is filled rivalry, failures and great achievements. The electric light bulb has been called the most important invention since man-made fire. The light bulb helped to establish social order after sundown, extended the workday well into the night, and allowed us to navigate and travel safely in the dark. Without the light bulb, there would be no nightlife. However, creating a steady and affordable source of illumination was not as easy as many history textbooks suggest. The modern light bulb is the result of many innovators' work and continuous improvements over 150 years.

  2. 1700s
    The First Artificial Sources of Light

    Before the arrival of electric lighting, people used a variety of tricks for navigating their neighborhoods at night. In The Downs, an area near the English Channel, patches of chalky soil were used as beacons known as down lanterns. In wooded areas, bark was strategically cut from trees to expose the lighter wood underneath. However, on most clear nights, the moon and starlight were strong enough to navigate at night.

     

    In the 18th century, candles and oil lamps illuminated most homes and businesses. These early sources of illumination emitted a weak light, smoked, and gave off foul odors. They were also dangerous and required constant attention. Wealthy aristocrats used beeswax and spermaceti candles to light up their lavish households. The middle class used cheap tallow candles while the poor used rushlights, makeshift candles made from reeds dipped in animal or vegetable fat and ignited, which burned for a short time.

    Rushlights, candles and oil lamps were early forms of lighting.

  3. 1800s

    During the 19th century, gas lighting replaced candles and oil lamps in many homes, businesses, and streets. Gas lamps produced a brighter and more efficient illumination. They also cost 75 percent less than candles or oil lamps, and were easier and safer to operate. By the 1850s, most city streets in the United States and Europe were illuminated by gas lamps. Gas lighting is credited with reducing crime rates and increasing literacy in many areas. As electricity became more widespread during the turn of the century, gas lamps were replaced by incandescent lamps in streets, businesses, and theaters.

    Gas lighting was popular during the 1800s.

  4. 1802
    The First Electric Lights

    In 1802, Sir Humphry Davy, an English physician, created the first electric light by passing a current through a platinum strip. The glow did not last long, but it marked the beginning of the history of light bulbs. In 1809, Davy demonstrated the first carbon arc lamp at the Royal Institute in London by connecting two wires to a battery and attaching a charcoal strip between the other ends of the wires. While the scientific community and the public raved about the demonstration, the arc lamp burned too brightly and consumed a large amount of current, which quickly drained the battery and rendered the lamp impractical for commercial development and production. Several decades passed before electric generators made arc lamps practical for street and theater lighting.

    Sir Humphry Davy

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Light Pollution: The Dark Side of Outdoor Lights

How Artificial Nighttime Lighting Is Affecting Our Skies, Wildlife, Environment, and Health

 

As many homeowners, you are taking steps to reduce your carbon footprint at home. You dutifully recycle glass, metal, paper, and plastic waste each week. You replace all the incandescent light bulbs in your home with energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) or light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs. However, you may be unwittingly contributing to carbon emissions and interfering with delicate ecosystems through light pollution.

 

Light pollution, unlike other forms of contamination and waste, remains largely overlooked and unregulated in many countries. Learn the cause, types, and effects of light pollution, and how adjusting your outdoor lighting habits can reduce this form of waste.

 

What is Light Pollution?

Light pollution, also known as photopollution or luminous pollution, is the excessive, misdirected or invasive use of artificial outdoor lighting. Mismanaged lighting alters the color and contrast of the nighttime sky, eclipses natural starlight, and disrupts circadian rhythms (the 24-hour processes of most organisms), which affects the environment, energy resources, wildlife, humans and astronomy research. The threat of light pollution continues to grow as the demand for artificial light increases each year.

 

Photopollution is not a new phenomenon. Over the last 50 years, as countries became affluent and urbanized, demand for outdoor lighting increased and light pollution sprawled beyond the city limits and into suburban and rural areas. This form pollution is now prevalent in Asia, Europe, and North America, particularly in cities like Los Angeles, New York and Washington D.C. In 2008, National Geographic magazine named Chicago the most light-polluted city in the United States.

 

However, the most light-polluted spot in the world is Hong Kong, China. In March 2013, the University of Hong Kong named the city the most light polluted in the world. A study by the university found the night sky in Tsim Sha Tsui, an urban neighborhood in southern Kowloon, Hong Kong, to be 1,200 times brighter than a normal urban city sky. Luminous pollution of this magnitude is on the rise worldwide. In a 2010 article from the Ecology and Society Journal, Hölker and others stated the use of artificial lighting increases by 20% each year, depending on the region, and noted there is an urgent need for light pollution policies that surpass energy efficiency to include humans, animals and the environment.

 

10 Fire Safety Tips for Kids and Adults

Learn How to Protect Your Home from Electrical Fires

According to FEMA, electrical fires end the lives of roughly 280 Americans each year, while injuring 1,000 more. The causes of these fires range from easy preventable extension cord problems to serious issues such as bad wiring in your living space. When installing and using our ceiling fans, floor fans and lighting fixtures we ask you to consider using these fire safety tips. 

 

NashuaPatch.com recently reported a fire that started in an apartment building because of a malfunctioning overheated bathroom ceiling fan. The Watertown Patch more recently reported a two-alarm blaze in a home that was caused by faulty wiring in a ceiling fan. Thankfully no one was hurt, but the fires caused hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of damage to the buildings and displaced two families.

 

Kids Fire SafetyFire Safety Worksheet Fire Safety Certificate

 

Electrical Fire Safety Interview with a Fireman

 

 

 

How to Use Ambient, Accent, and Task Lighting

15 Ways to Master the Different Types of Lighting in Your Home and Office
 

What is task lighting? How to create accent lighting? What else is available besides ambient lighting? With so many different types of lighting available, it can get a little confusing when designing a lighting scheme for your home or office. Our guide explains the different types of lighting - ambient, task and accent, how to use them effectively, and which light fixtures to use create your desired lighting.

 

Three Main Types of Lighting

1. Ambient Lighting (General Lighting)

This is one of the most common types of lighting. Ambient light is a soft glow that blankets your space just enough for you to function without causing a harsh glare. In photography and cinematography, ambient light is considered the “natural light” within a room. In décor, ambient light is very similar, except you create the ambient light by making the room’s lighting as natural and flat as possible. While ambient light is meant to get you safely from point A-to-B, it is not ideal for working closely with things or to highlight things around your space.

 

Ambient Lighting

 

Atmosphere: When used correctly, ambient light creates a fantastic environment to relax from an overly stressful day or to have a warm conversation with an old friend. Ambient lighting is often referred to as mood lighting, because this light captures the soft curves of your face and allows your pupils to dilate slightly (a physical sign of affection). Some yoga studios have even begun using the softer ambient lighting in their classes to help draw stress from the body.

 

How to Get This Look: We recommend using the following lights to create ambient light.

 

Landscape Lighting: 5 Illuminating Ideas

Make the Most of Your Home Landscape with Lighting

Nighttime Landscape LightingWhen we decided to landscape the front of our home, our landscape designer sent us on a tour of the town’s most beautifully landscaped front yards. We loved driving around to different neighborhoods, admiring the flower-filled beds in front of one home and the mature trees towering over another, but it wasn’t until he asked us to revisit some of those homes again, at night, did we see the full picture of exterior accent lighting. Landscapes that looked merely pretty by day seemed to come to life in the evening, glowing with mystery and drama. And that’s when we first discovered the power of landscape lighting.

 

Fortunately, adding warmth and magic to an outdoor area through the use of landscape lighting is easier than ever thanks to the stunning array of lighting available today. Hopefully, these 5 simple steps will show you how easily you can create an inviting outdoor living area through the use of lighting.

 

New to the art of landscaping? Hinkley Lighting is one of the leading experts on landscape lighting. View this Hinkley video first to help with some tips and tricks of the trade to getting your landscaping project underway.

 

 

1. Survey Your Space: The first step will be to decide which area of your outdoor space you want to tackle first. Keep in mind that while landscape lights are beautiful, they are also an important security measure. Which areas would benefit the most from being well-lit and inviting?

 

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